麻豆传媒色情片

B.S. Adolescence to Young Adult Education (7-12)
120
Credit Hours
75%
Max Transfer Credit
Class Type
Online coursework, 6, 8, 12 & 16-week courses

Excel as a Secondary School Teacher in Ohio

Develop the knowledge and skills you need to become an outstanding middle or high school teacher in Ohio with Franklin鈥檚 Adolescence to Young Adult (AYA) Education program. In the AYA Education program, you鈥檒l combine theory and practical application to learn how to inspire greatness in your students. 

Program Availability

Online
On Site

Transfer Friendly

Use the credit you鈥檝e earned to satisfy degree requirements.

Cut Your Costs

Low tuition, free books and no hidden fees save you money.

100% Online Coursework

Balance earning your degree with other work-life commitments.

Learn from the Best

Our faculty and co-operating teachers are best in class.

Jump Right In

Be placed in a school in your very first term.

21st Century Curriculum

Master proven teaching methods as well as emerging technology.

B.S. Adolescence to Young Adult Education Program Overview

Develop teaching skills for secondary education

Follow your dreams and inspire your students to follow theirs. By putting theory into practice, you鈥檒l learn how to teach integrated language arts, math or social studies at the middle or high-school level.

You鈥檒l build on the Professional Education Component courses required for all education students with methods block courses tailored to toward your goal of teaching in grades 7-12. Field placements, completed each term, as well as your student teaching experience let you put new-found knowledge into action with experiences intended to build your confidence and proficiency as a classroom teacher. 

As a Franklin student, you鈥檒l be guided through the coursework and prepared for the assessments required to qualify for an Ohio Resident Educator License. Upon your enrollment, you鈥檒l be issued a free Taskstream account to keep you on track as you work to complete the requirements for your degree and intended licensure. With Taskstream, you鈥檒l be able to see when important documentation, like background clearance check information, has been received. You鈥檒l also be able to use Taskstream as a gateway to important information like clinical field placement information and course resources. 

Learn by doing with immersive learning opportunities woven throughout the program

You鈥檒l hit the ground running at Franklin, by starting field experiences with your very first term. Based on your preferences, you鈥檒l be paired with an experienced cooperating teacher to observe teaching methods, ask meaningful questions and provide assistance when requested. By taking part in these clinical field placements each term you are enrolled, you鈥檒l be placed in different school environments for opportunities to diversify your experiences and build your professional network. 

Through clinical field placements and student teaching experiences, you鈥檒l benefit from partnerships between Franklin鈥檚 School of Education and more than 200 partner school districts that serve Ohio鈥檚 rural areas as well as suburbs, cities and towns. 

The hands-on, full-time student teaching experience in your last term will enable you to work alongside a cooperating teacher to put into practice the knowledge, skills and dispositions that you have developed throughout the course of the program. 

Build the fundamentals necessary to be a successful teacher

All education students, regardless of intended licensure area, must successfully complete 33 hours of Professional Education Component Courses. While these courses can be taken at Franklin or transferred in, this coursework lays the foundation for future studies by providing a roadmap for success as an education major. Through these classes, you鈥檒l build a toolbox of skills to become a teacher who is able to tailor your instruction to meet the needs of your students. Course topics include lesson planning, classroom technology, classroom management and teaching strategies. 

Gain in-demand skills that enable you to leverage technology to engage learners

Technology impacts every industry and every aspect of our lives. For this reason, effective teachers need to be able to integrate technology into the classroom as a tool to facilitate student learning and enhance communication with stakeholders in the learning process 鈥 like parents/guardians, school administrators and the community. 

Franklin鈥檚 Technology in the Classroom course, a required course for all education students, is aligned with International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE) standards. ISTE, a global organization dedicated to using the power of technology to transform teaching and learning, and the group鈥檚 standards are a framework for innovation in education put in place to help you to become a teacher who can prepare students to thrive in a connected and ever-changing world. 

In this unique course, you鈥檒l master Edmodo, Google Classroom, Kahoot!, Quizlet, Remind 101 and other emerging digital tools to help you with classroom management and polling, photo and video sharing, discussion and publishing, and social media and communication. You鈥檒l learn how to integrate technology that places student in the center of the learning environment. You鈥檒l have the opportunity to demonstrate your learning through hands-on assignments like teaching a lesson to your peers using various tech tools. 

Focus in on your licensure area with methods block coursework

Franklin鈥檚 AYA Education program contains a methods block, a specialized set of courses that get at the heart of your particular teaching goal. These courses focus on teaching in specific content areas 鈥 language arts, mathematics, social studies or science. Moreover, the coursework in this block provides multiple opportunities for you to teach in front of a classroom and be provided with feedback to fuel your progress along the way. 

Take advantage of flexible transfer options and earn an affordable education degree

Whether you鈥檝e earned an associate degree in education or in a teaching content area, Franklin鈥檚 transfer-friendly AYA Education program provides a flexible and affordable path to a high-quality degree. In addition to maximized transfer and our low per credit hour tuition rate, Franklin also provides free books and eliminates fees for field placements and student teaching that are common at other universities. 

Read more >

Your Best Value B.S. Adolescence to Young Adult Education 7-12

Choose Franklin's accredited B.S. Adolescence to Young Adult Education 7-12 and get a high-quality degree that fits your life and budget.     

Keep the Credit You've Earned

90
MAX TRANSFER HOURS

Transfer up to 75% of required credits to finish faster and spend less.

Students must complete a minimum of 30 credit hours at 麻豆传媒色情片 to be eligible for a degree.

×

Partner? Pay Less.

Search below to see if you could save tuition through an employer or professional 
organization partnership.

$47,760
Total Tuition
(After Partner Discount)

Student Satisfaction

98%
STUDENT SATISFACTION

98% of graduating students would recommend Franklin to their family, friends and/or colleagues.

Source: 麻豆传媒色情片, Office of Career Development Student Satisfaction Survey (Summer 2023)

×

Tuition Guarantee

Inflation-proof your degree cost by locking-in your tuition rate from day one through graduation.

×

Adolescence to Young Adult Education Courses & Curriculum

120 Semester Hours
Fundamental General Education
English Composition
ENG 120 - 麻豆传媒色情片Writing (4)

In this course, students acquire the writing competencies necessary for completing analytical and argumentative papers supported by secondary research. A variety of assignments, beginning with personal reflections, build upon one another, as students develop ideas that respond to, critique, and synthesize the positions of others. Students systematize and organize knowledge in ways that will help them in all their courses. The course also emphasizes the elements of critical reading, effective writing style, appropriate grammar and mechanics, clarity of language, and logical and cohesive development. It culminates in submission of an extended, documented research paper.

Mathematics
MATH 215 - Statistical Concepts (4)

This course introduces you to statistics with applications to various areas. The course covers both descriptive and inferential statistics. Topics included are: sampling techniques, data types, experiments; measures of central tendency, measures of dispersion, graphical displays of data, basic probability concepts, binomial and normal probability distributions, sampling distributions and Central Limit Theorem; confidence intervals, hypothesis tests of a mean, or a proportion for one or two populations, and linear regression.

Choose either MATH 140 Introduction to Quantitative Reasoning or MATH 150 Fundamental Algebra as the prerequisite to MATH 215. Course can count as a University Elective.

Science

6 credits from the following types of courses:
Two courses from the Science discipline. One course must have a lab component.

Social and Behavioral Sciences
PSYC 110 - General Psychology (4)

This course is a survey of the various fields of study comprising modern scientific psychology. We will examine the theories, research findings, and applications in each of the major areas of psychology, with the goal of providing students with practical information they can apply to their personal and professional lives. The topic areas covered in the course include learning and memory, motivation and emotion, human development, theories of personality, psychopathology, and social behavior.

2 credits from the following types of courses:
Choose from the Anthropology, Economics, Geography, History, Political Science, or Sociology disciplines.

Arts & Humanities

6 credits from the following types of courses:
Choose from the Art, English Literature, Fine Arts, Humanities, Music, Philosophy, Religion or Theater disciplines.

Additional General Education
PF 121 - Basic Learning Strategies (2)

This course prepares students to be successful lifelong learners both academically and in their chosen careers. Franklin courses require a high level of self-directed learning and focus on the skills required in the workplace and the classroom that are easily transferrable between the two environments. The course includes strategies for time management, goal setting, reading comprehension, and advancing communication skills, including the use of electronic tools to participate in virtual environments.

OR PF 321 - Learning Strategies (2)

This course prepares students to be successful lifelong learners both academically and in their chosen careers. Franklin courses require a high level of self-directed learning and focus on the skills required in the workplace and the classroom that are easily transferable between the two environments. The course includes strategies for advancing communication skills, including the use of electronic tools to participate in virtual environments. The assignments and activities in the course are created to closely simulate teamwork found in the workplace.

COMM 150 - Interpersonal Communication (4)

By using applied critical and creative thinking, students in this course will develop a set of communication skills that will enhance their personal and professional relationships and endeavors. This course will focus on skill development in key areas such as self, perception, listening, verbal messages, conversations, relationships, conflict management, persuasion, and presentation skills.

OR SPCH 100 - Speech Communication (4)

This basic public-speaking course intends to improve the student's ability to think critically and to communicate orally. Theory and practice are provided in various speaking situations. Each student is required to speak before an audience, but class work also involves reading, gathering and organizing information, writing, and listening.

4 credits from the following types of courses:
Any General Education course at the 100 or 200 level

Professional Education Component
EDP 401 - Education in Diverse Society (3)

This course explores the profession of education and examines the state, federal, and institutional standards that guide the profession. Students will examine the psychological, sociological, and philosophical foundations of education as they relate to learning. Topics of discussion and analysis include the development of individual differences; atmosphere of respect; understanding students' needs grouping, education of minorities; how the teacher creates instructional opportunities that are equitable and adaptable to diverse learners; exploring the components of individual and group motivation and behavior to create a learning environment that encourages positive social interaction, active engagement in learning, and self-motivation.

EDP 403 - Nature & Need of Learners With Exceptionalities (3)

This course provides students the opportunity to develop an understanding of the philosophical, historical, and legal foundations of special education as well as an understanding of the characteristics of learners who have special needs; explore and define the concepts of special education in schools and society, and acquire knowledge about the legal and procedural aspects of special education and develop an understanding and respect for individual needs and diversity. Students relate multicultural issues, beliefs, and practices to the needs of the student with mild/moderate disabilities, explore crisis intervention/prevention models and strategies and examine conflict resolution. This course presents students with the opportunity to develop an understanding of the issues relating to developing and encouraging positive social interaction skills, issues relating to the diverse emotional needs of students with mild/moderate disabilities, and issues relating to student behavior.

EDP 421 - Child & Adolescent Literature (3)

The course explores literature for the early and middle childhood aged student with an emphasis on standards for selection of materials with reference to the interests, needs, and abilities of children at the different levels within these ranges of ages. Attention is given to books and their uses in all subject matters. Special emphasis is placed on activities that will motivate early and middle childhood students to read. The goal of creating life-long readers is stressed.

EDP 423 - Instructional Planning for Pk12 Learners (3)

The course examines introductory aspects of instructional planning as well as the common strategies teachers employ to conduct their lessons. Basic elements of measurement and assessment that are essential to effective teaching are addressed. It assumes students have an understanding of the content they will teach and an extensive understanding and appreciation of the students with whom they will work. The overriding purpose of the course resides in the transformation of content and behavioral objectives into sequences of instructional activities that make them accessible to students and the central role assessments play in the instructional process as teachers construct and utilize various types of assessment to provide valid measures of learning outcomes.

EDUC 309 - Technology in the Classroom (3)

This course is designed to emphasize the connectivity of technology to the classroom and the general curriculum. Students will explore programs that will aid them in classroom management, data collection, student-produced work, creating instructional tools, and administration of classroom responsibilities. Students will develop products that can be used to support their teaching and the learning process of their students.

EDP 405 - Applying Educational Psychology to Instruction (3)

This course provides students the opportunity to develop an understanding of the theories of cognition, intelligence, and learning, especially as it relates to identifying children with special needs. A developmental perspective will be utilized in the examination of the biological, social, psychological, and cultural influences on growth and change during childhood and adolescence. Students begin the process of relating the theories to instruction and assessment processes.

EDP 429 - Classroom Assessment (3)

This course will provide students the opportunity to examine and create a variety of valid and reliable classroom assessments. Students will also explore how to use data to influence classroom decisions, guide and improve teaching skills, and tailor instruction to individual learning needs. This course will also make the connection between constructive evaluation skills such as constructive feedback; helping students monitor their own progress; influence students? continuing motivation; and perceptions of self-efficacy as learners and their positive effect on student learning.

EDP 471 - Collaboration & Management (3)

This course provides students the opportunity to develop skills in planning and managing the teaching and learning environment; managing student behavior and social interaction skills; communicating effectively; developing collaborative partnerships; and demonstrating professionalism and ethical practices. Students become familiar with daily management skills, safety and health issues in the classroom, creating and modifying a supportive learning environment, and behavior management skills. The course also focuses on the development and interaction of the educational team on methods and models of collaborative practices with parents, students, educational personnel, and members of the community and incorporates this into the instructional process.

EDP 472 - Differentiating Curricul. (3)

This course will provide students with the opportunity to explore research and theory on the effectiveness of differentiated classrooms; examine the importance of differentiating instruction for today's diverse student population; recognize the need to increase variety in teaching, learning, and assessment to respond to individual student needs; utilize strategies including assignment tiering, graphic organizers, critical thinking skills, reflection and assessment strategies customized for a mixed-ability classroom; diagnose student needs and prescribe tasks that create better matches between learning needs and preferences and plan and implement methods appropriate for assessing individual learning needs in a performance-based curriculum.

EDP 495 - PK12 Reflection and Seminar (3)

The PK12 Reflection and Seminar is the in-class seminar portion of the student teaching experienced designed to meet the requirements for the Resident Educator License. The seminar provides teacher candidates with an opportunity to continue developing the skills needed to become a reflective practitioner based upon their practicum experience in the field component of student teaching.

EDUC 220 - Introduction to Education (3)

This course is required for prospective teachers seeking the Resident Elementary Education License. This course explores the history, philosophy, purposes, and societal needs for elementary education. Appropriate organization and curriculum for PK-5 will be discussed. Readiness for learning will be investigated.

Major Area Required
EDUC 471 - Adolescence to Young Adult Language Arts Methods (3)

This course is required for prospective teachers seeking the Resident Educator Adolescence to Young Adult License. This course provides teacher candidates with a survey of the methods and materials for teaching language arts. It includes the areas of grammar and usage, spelling, handwriting, composition, dramatics, and speaking. It shows students how reading ability is built solidly upon the other language arts of listening, speaking, and writing.

OR EDUC 473 - Adolescence to Young Adult Social Studies Methods (3)

This course is meant only for those students enrolled in a licensure program due to assignments and program assessments that require a clinical field experience placement. Designed to prepare teacher candidates to teach social studies content for grades 7 to 12, attention is given to citizenship education, the world as a global community, the important role of values in guiding human behavior, financial literacy and individual differences among learners. Additionally, the course examines the nature, development, purpose, and value of social studies, with emphasis on methods and techniques of instruction, curriculum reorganization, and evaluation.

OR EDUC 474 - Mathematics Methods and Materials for AYA Educators (3)

This course is required for prospective teachers seeking the Resident Educator License. It examines the kinds of curricular themes, problems, and issues that are appropriate for children in the AYA block and is based upon appropriate developmental theory. Learned societies and other research literature have also been used to provide the basis for the selection of this curriculum and for the materials, teaching strategies and assessment techniques that are included as part of the course.

EDP 493 - Professional Growth & Development AYA (9)

The professional growth and development practicum is the field portion of the student teaching experience designed to meet the requirements for licensure. The practicum is an in-depth clinical laboratory experience that provides opportunities to observe, analyze, plan, and practice teaching methods in a school setting. The experience enables the teacher candidate to move through stages of increased responsibilities under the guidance and with the support of a cooperating teacher and a university supervisor.

Foundations of Reading
EDUC 332 - Reading in the Content Areas (3)

This course is required for prospective teachers seeking the Resident Educator Middle Childhood License, the Resident Educator Adolescence to Young Adult License, or the Resident Educator Intervention Specialist License. The course explores the development from learning-to-read to using reading to learn. It investigates the role of vocabulary instruction, comprehension, study skills, and the writing process. It also addresses the assessment of textbooks, the reading process, and student motivation.

Content Area
ENG 210 - American Literature (Civil War - Present) (3)

A study of literary periods beginning with the New Consciousness (1865) to contemporary literature with emphasis on the contributions of primary writers in exploring themes, characters, and situations common to American literature. Not open to students with credit for ENG 310. This course is only available through the Acadeum Course Share platform as a part of the University's membership in the Council of Independent Colleges' Online Course Sharing Consortium (CIC-OCSC). Please contact your academic advisor for more information.

ENG 212 - British Literature (Anglo-Saxon to Renaissance) (3)

A study of Old and Middle English authors, and early and later Renaissance authors. Emphasis is on major writers and their works, with some coverage of literary history. Not open to students with credit for ENG 312. This course is only available through the Acadeum Course Share platform as a part of the University's membership in the Council of Independent Colleges' Online Course Sharing Consortium (CIC-OCSC). Please contact your academic advisor for more information.

ENG 220 - Research Writing: Exploring Professional Identities (4)

This is an intermediate course focusing on the composition of research papers. Students in this course prepare to be active participants in professional discourse communities by examining and practicing the writing conventions associated with their own fields of study and work. By calling attention to the conventions of disciplinary writing, the course also prepares students for upper-division college writing and the special conventions of advanced academic discourse. Course activities include three extended research papers, semi-formal writing addressing interdisciplinary communication, and readings fostering critical engagement with disciplinary conversations.

ENG 306 - English Language & Linguistics (3)

A survey of linguistic terminology and practice in linguistic analysis, with an historical survey of the history of English from its beginnings in 450 A.D. to modern times. Emphasis will be on morphology, syntax, semantics, and language variation. This course is only available through the Acadeum Course Share platform as a part of the University's membership in the Council of Independent Colleges' Online Course Sharing Consortium (CIC-OCSC). Please contact your academic advisor for more information.

ENG 320 - Business & Professional Writing (4)

This is an advanced composition course that focuses on writing for business and professional purposes. Students will review the writing conventions commonly expected within business and professional environments, as well as strategies for analyzing rhetorical situations within those environments. Coursework includes analysis, revision, and research exercises, as well as substantial practice in composing business correspondence. The final project is an extensive, researched business proposal developed in stages and presented to the class. Students will be encouraged to relate course materials to their major programs and workplace experiences.

ENG 350 - Special Studies in English (3)

This course is an in-depth study of literature, rhetoric, or a sub-area of English studies. The course focuses on one of the following: a particular historical or literary period (Medieval, Elizabethan, Romantic, Post-Modern, etc.), genre of literature (Science Fiction, Graphic Novels, Poetry, Drama, etc.), specific area of rhetoric (visual rhetoric, medical rhetoric, etc.) or sub-area of English studies (gaming, teaching of writing, community-based writing, etc.). Repeatable provided course content changes substantially. This course is only available through the Acadeum Course Share platform as a part of the University's membership in the Council of Independent Colleges' Online Course Sharing Consortium (CIC-OCSC). Please contact your academic advisor for more information.

ENG 406 - Advanced Composition (3)

This course is a study in academic and professional writing, with an emphasis on designing and reporting primary research. Students will also examine and produce professional documents such as CVs, personal statements, and research agendas.

COMM 150 - Interpersonal Communication (4)

By using applied critical and creative thinking, students in this course will develop a set of communication skills that will enhance their personal and professional relationships and endeavors. This course will focus on skill development in key areas such as self, perception, listening, verbal messages, conversations, relationships, conflict management, persuasion, and presentation skills.

COMM 215 - Journalism and Media Writing (3)

In this course, students learn how to write news, editorials, features, scripts, and press releases for various types of traditional and broadcast formats. They also explore the processes associated with the marketing of those endeavors. In addition, the class serves as an introduction to the legal and ethical aspects of what to print/broadcast as well as the historical and contemporary contexts which influence these modern journalism and storytelling approaches.

OR

MATH 215 - Statistical Concepts (4)

This course introduces you to statistics with applications to various areas. The course covers both descriptive and inferential statistics. Topics included are: sampling techniques, data types, experiments; measures of central tendency, measures of dispersion, graphical displays of data, basic probability concepts, binomial and normal probability distributions, sampling distributions and Central Limit Theorem; confidence intervals, hypothesis tests of a mean, or a proportion for one or two populations, and linear regression.

MATH 241 - Calculus and Analytic Geometry I (4)

A study of single variable calculus including functions, limits, the derivative, applications of the derivative, the integral, and applications of the integral.

MATH 242 - Calculus and Analytic Geometry II (4)

A continuation of MATH 241 which includes logarthmic and exponential functions, inverse trigonometric and hyperbolic functions, techniques of integration, indeterminate forms, improper integrals, and sequences and series. This course is only available through the Acadeum Course Share platform as a part of the University's membership in the Council of Independent Colleges' Online Course Sharing Consortium (CIC-OCSC). Please contact your academic advisor for more information.

MATH 320 - Discrete Mathematics (4)

This course introduces students to fundamental algebraic, logical, and combinational concepts in mathematics that are needed in upper-division computer science courses. Topics include sets, mappings, and relations; elementary counting principles; proof techniques with an emphasis on mathematical induction; graphs and directed graphs; Boolean algebras; recursion; and applications to computer science.

MATH 418 - 麻豆传媒色情片Geometry (3)

A study of Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometries as a logical system of undefined terms, defined terms, axioms, and theorems. This course is only available through the Acadeum Course Share platform as a part of the University's membership in the Council of Independent Colleges' Online Course Sharing Consortium (CIC-OCSC). Please contact your academic advisor for more information.

MATH 427 - Linear Algebra (3)

A study of the basic concepts of linear algebra including systems of linear equations, Gaussian elimination, matrices, determinants, vectors, vector spaces, and linear transformations. This course is only available through the Acadeum Course Share platform as a part of the University's membership in the Council of Independent Colleges' Online Course Sharing Consortium (CIC-OCSC). Please contact your academic advisor for more information.

MATH 240 - Pre-Calculus (4)

A study of the basic concepts of algebra including factoring, graphing, equations, inequalities, ratio and proportion and rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, trigonometric functions, complex numbers, and some elementary topics in theory of equations.

MATH 160 - 麻豆传媒色情片Algebra (4)

This course is designed to prepare students for Applied Calculus and Discrete Mathematics and to provide the mathematical background needed for the analytic reasoning used in other courses. Topics include functions and their graphs, including exponential and logarithmic functions; complex numbers; systems of equations and inequalities; matrices; basic principles of counting and probability; and other selected topics. Note, this course has proctored exam(s).

OR

HIST 221 - World Civilization I: Prehistory-1500 (3)

A survey of the major historical periods in civilization from early beginnings to circa 1500 A.D. Students will gain perspectives of world civilization in addition to Western cultural focuses. This survey will integrate art, philosophy, science, and history into meaningful themes.

HIST 222 - World Civilization II: 1400-Present (3)

A survey of the major historical periods in civilization from circa 1500 A.D. to the present. Students will gain perspectives of world civilization in addition to Western cultural focuses. This survey will integrate art, philosophy, science, and history into meaningful themes.

HIST 341 - United States Social & Cultural History (3)

An exploration of the development of the social and cultural history of the United States from the colonial period to today. Emphasis is placed upon the United States' diverse peoples and the cultural forces that shaped their daily lives. Special attention will be given to: Native American, African Americans, Reform Movements, Popular Culture, with emphasis on race, class, gender, ethnicity, technology, environment, industrialization, urbanization, immigration, migration and wars.

POSC 204 - American Government (3)

The course examines the complex political and legal environment of public administration. Students learn how politics, law, and the structure and principles of American government impact citizens, public policy, and the administration of public and nonprofit organizations. Students apply fundamental political theories and administrative law principles in administrative contexts. Students pursuing the Public Administration major should take this course prior to beginning their specialization course work.

POSC 206 - State and Local Government (3)

An introductory course concerning the structure and function of state and local government in the United States. Special attention is focused on the relation between governmental structure, citizen access to government, political resources, and political outcomes.

HUMN 218 - World Religions (4)

World Religions is a comparative study of the founders, sacred writings, beliefs and practices of some of the major world religions: Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, Islam, Judaism and Christianity. This course enables the student to study and compare the leading religions of the world in light of their historical and cultural backgrounds. Students will be encouraged to explore faith traditions other than their own. Common themes across religions, spiritual practice, and current related cultural and political issues will also be considered.

ANTH 215 - Cultural Anthropology (4)

This course exposes students to the principles, concepts, research methods, and applications of cultural anthropology. Students will be introduced to the wide range of variation in social and institutional arrangements found historically and cross-culturally. From language to gender roles, from bases of social stratification to causes and consequences of conformity, from the simpler life in foraging societies to the seeming-chaos in modern post-industrial societies: students will examine the enormous variation in solutions to the requisites of social life.

POSC 405 - Constitutional Law (3)

This course focuses on those areas of constitutional interpretation involving civil rights and liberties and the powers of government. Theories of constitutional interpretation will be reviewed in conjunction with pivotal cases defining the nature of citizenship and the exercise of governance.

ECON 210 - Introduction to Microeconomics (4)

An introduction to economic theory involving the examination of how decision making by firms and individuals is shaped by economic forces. Emphasis is placed on demand, supply, market equilibrium analysis, and basic market structure models. The invisible hand as the driving force for economic decisions as well as market externalities are discussed. The class concentrates on providing a balanced approach to studying economic agents' behavior and the global implications and outcomes.

OR

Adolescence to Young Adult Education (Grades 7 to 12) license requires teachers to be highly qualified in one major content area. Students will need 30 credit hours in their selected content area (English Language Arts, Mathematics or Social Studies) to meet program requirements. The post-baccalaureate licensure program is highly customized based on the bachelor鈥檚 degree courses students have already taken and those still needed to satisfy the requirements to sit for Adolescence to Young Adult (Grades 7-12) licensure. As a result, required courses may be taken online directly from 麻豆传媒色情片, online through Acadeum, through Franklin鈥檚 consortium agreement with the Council of Independent Colleges (CIC), or on-site or online as part of an agreement with one of our community college partners. Students should work directly with their academic advisor to review coursework remaining to fulfill their selected content areas and the best plan to complete those courses. The following are suggested courses for each Content Area.

University Electives

6 credits from the following types of courses:
Any undergraduate courses offered by the University except developmental education courses.

Additional Requirements

All students are required to pass 麻豆传媒色情片Writing (ENG 120), and either Basic Learning Strategies (PF 121) or Learning Strategies (PF 321) prior to enrolling in any course at the 200 level or above. Students who enroll at Franklin with 30 or fewer hours of transfer credit are required to pass PF 121 Basic Learning Strategies in place of PF 321 Learning Strategies. Interpersonal Communication (COMM 150) or Speech Communication (SPCH 100) must be taken prior to enrolling in any course at the 300 level or above. Students must also meet the University algebra competency requirement.

Academic Minors

Personalize your degree with a minor. Explore available minors, learn how minors can benefit you, and find out what requirements you must meet to earn a minor.

Learn More

Specialized Accreditation

Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation

The School of Education at 麻豆传媒色情片 holds accreditation for its initial-level educator preparation programs through Fall 2026 from the Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation (CAEP), 1140 19th St NW, Suite 400 Washington, DC 20036 (202) 223-0077. The following bachelor's degree and post-baccalaureate initial-level licensure programs were included in the CAEP accreditation review: Adolescence to Young Adult Education (7-12), Intervention Specialist: Mild-Moderate (K-12), Middle Childhood Education, and Primary Education (PK-5).

For more information about the Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation, please click .

CAEP Accountibility Measures

The CAEP (Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation) Accountability Measures are used to provide information to the public on both program outcome and program impact, those measures with supporting documentation are provided at this link.

B.S. Adolescence to Young Adult Education (7-12) Program Details

Ready to make a difference in education?

Get a FREE action plan filled with resources and recommendations from those who are already there.

Find Your Education Program

Advance your career and be the difference maker you aspire to be with an online education degree from 麻豆传媒色情片. Franklin has education programs that cater to educators and leaders in traditional PK-12 roles, as well as those who work in corporate, nonprofit or governmental organizations. 

Educators bring out the best in those around them. Classroom teacher. Corporate trainer. CEO. Your passion will inform your path 鈥 and Franklin has the program to help you reach your destination.

Program Minimum Credentials
B.S. Adolescence to Young Adult (Grades 7-12) H.S. Diploma or Equivalent

What is it?
The B.S. Adolescence to Young Adult Education degree prepares students to teach grades 7-12 in Ohio by providing the coursework and assessments required to qualify for an Ohio Resident Educator License.   

What will I learn?
Course topics include lesson planning, classroom technology, classroom management and teaching strategies. In addition, the AYA Education program contains a specialized set of courses focused on teaching in specific content areas 鈥 language arts, mathematics, social studies or science. To meet requirements for AYA licensure, you will choose one area of concentration from the content areas.  

What can I do with a B.S. Adolescence to Young Adult (Grades 7-12)?
With a B.S. Adolescence to Young Adult Education degree, you can teach language arts, mathematics or social studies in Ohio's middle or high schools. 

Is there classroom experience or a capstone?
You'll combine online coursework with an on-site field placement during every term of your enrollment. In your final term, you'll complete a full-time student teaching experience alongside a cooperating teacher. 

How long will it take to complete?
Bachelor's-level education programs require 120 credit hours and are designed to be completed in 4 years. However, if you have previously earned credit hours - including an associate degree in education or in a teaching content area, Franklin鈥檚 transfer-friendly AYA Education program provides a flexible and accelerated path to a degree.   

B.S. Intervention Specialist: Mild-Moderate (K-12) H.S. Diploma or Equivalent

What is it?
  The B.S. Intervention Specialist degree prepares students to teach special education in grades K-12 in Ohio by providing the coursework and assessments required to qualify for an Ohio Resident Educator License.  

What will I learn?
Course topics include lesson planning, classroom technology, classroom management and teaching strategies. In addition, the Intervention Specialist Education program contains a specialized set of courses focused on teaching in specific content areas 鈥 language arts, mathematics, social studies or science, as well as four courses concentrated on reading instruction.

What can I do with a B.S. Intervention Specialist: Mild-Moderate (K-12)?
With a B.S. Intervention Specialist Education degree, you can be a special education teacher for grades K-12 in Ohio.  

Is there classroom experience or a capstone?
You'll combine online coursework with an on-site field placement during every term of your enrollment. In your final term, you'll complete a full-time student teaching experience alongside a cooperating teacher. 

How long will it take to complete?
Bachelor's-level education programs require 120 credit hours and are designed to be completed in 4 years. However, if you have previously earned credit hours - including an associate degree in education or in a teaching content area, Franklin鈥檚 transfer-friendly Intervention Specialist Education program provides a flexible and accelerated path to a degree.  

B.S. Middle Childhood Education (Grades 4-9) H.S. Diploma or Equivalent

What is it?
The B.S. Middle Childhood Education degree prepares students to teach grades 4-9 in Ohio by providing the coursework and assessments required to qualify for an Ohio Resident Educator License. 

What will I learn?
Course topics include lesson planning, classroom technology, classroom management and teaching strategies. In addition, the MCE program contains a specialized set of courses focused on teaching in specific content areas 鈥 language arts, mathematics, social studies or science. To meet requirements for MCE licensure, you will choose two areas of concentration from the content areas.

What can I do with a B.S. Middle Childhood Education (Grades 4-9)?
With a B.S. Middle Childhood Education degree, you can teach language arts, mathematics, social studies or science in Ohio's middle schools.   

Is there classroom experience or a capstone?
You'll combine online coursework with an onsite field placement during every term of your enrollment. In your final term, you'll complete a full-time student teaching experience alongside a cooperating teacher. 

How long will it take to complete?
Bachelor's-level education programs require 120 credit hours and are designed to be completed in 4 years. However, if you have previously earned credit hours - including an associate degree in education or in a teaching content area, Franklin鈥檚 transfer-friendly MCE program provides a flexible and accelerated path to a degree.    

B.S. Primary Education (PK-5) H.S. Diploma or Equivalent

What is it?
The B.S. Primary Education degree prepares students to teach preschool through 5th grade in Ohio by providing the coursework and assessments required to qualify for an Ohio Resident Educator License. 

What will I learn?
Course topics include lesson planning, classroom technology, classroom management and teaching strategies. In addition, the Primary Education program contains a specialized set of courses focused on teaching in specific content areas 鈥 language arts, mathematics, social studies or science, as well as four courses concentrated on reading instruction.

What can I do with a B.S. Primary Education (PK-5)? 
With a B.S. Primary Education degree, you can teach preschool, kindergarten or elementary school in Ohio.   

Is there classroom experience or a capstone?
You'll combine online coursework with an on-site field placement during every term of your enrollment. In your final term, you'll complete a full-time student teaching experience alongside a cooperating teacher. 

How long will it take to complete?
Bachelor's-level education programs require 120 credit hours and are designed to be completed in 4 years. However, if you have previously earned credit hours - including an associate degree in education or in a teaching content area, Franklin鈥檚 transfer-friendly Primary Education program provides a flexible and accelerated path to a degree.     

Post-Baccalaureate Adolescence to Young Adult (Grades 7-12) Bachelor's Degree

What is it?
A direct route to becoming a 7th-12th grade teacher in Ohio, the Post-Baccalaureate Adolescence to Young Adult Education Licensure Program provides a bachelor's degree-holder with the coursework and assessments required to qualify for an Ohio Resident Educator License.

What will I learn?
Course topics include lesson planning, classroom technology, classroom management and teaching strategies. In addition, the AYA Education program contains a specialized set of courses focused on teaching in specific content areas 鈥 language arts, mathematics, social studies or science. To meet requirements for AYA licensure, you will choose one area of concentration from the content areas.   

What can I do with a Post-Baccalaureate Adolescence to Young Adult (Grades 7-12)? 
With the Post-Bacc Adolescence to Young Adult Education Licensure Program you can teach language arts, mathematics or social studies in Ohio's middle or high schools. 

Is there classroom experience or a capstone?
You'll combine online coursework with an on-site field placement during every term of your enrollment. In your final term, you'll complete a full-time student teaching experience alongside a cooperating teacher. 

How long will it take to complete?
Post-Baccalaureate AYA educator preparation programs require 78 hours of pedagogical and specialized content coursework to apply for a Ohio Resident Educator License. Franklin's transfer-friendly Post-Bacc programs enable you to make the most of your previously earned bachelor's degree credits to minimize time and cost toward teacher licensure.   

Post-Baccalaureate Intervention Specialist: Mild-Moderate (K-12) Bachelor's Degree

What is it?
A direct route to becoming a special education teacher in Ohio, the Post-Baccalaureate Intervention Specialist Education Licensure Program provides a bachelor's degree-holder with the coursework and assessments required to qualify for an Ohio Resident Educator License.       

What will I learn?
Course topics include lesson planning, classroom technology, classroom management and teaching strategies. In addition, the Intervention Specialist Education program contains a specialized set of courses focused on teaching in specific content areas 鈥 language arts, mathematics, social studies or science, as well as four courses concentrated on reading instruction. 

What can I do with a Post-Baccalaureate Intervention Specialist: Mild-Moderate (K-12)? 
With the Post-Bacc Intervention Specialist Licensure Program, you can be a special education teacher for grades K-12 in Ohio.  

Is there classroom experience or a capstone?
You'll combine online coursework with an onsite field placement during every term of your enrollment. In your final term, you'll complete a full-time student teaching experience alongside a cooperating teacher. 

How long will it take to complete?
Post-Baccalaureate Intervention Specialist educator preparation programs require 63 hours of pedagogical and specialized content coursework to apply for a Ohio Resident Educator License. Franklin's transfer-friendly Post-Bacc programs enable you to make the most of your previously earned bachelor's degree credits to minimize time and cost toward teacher licensure. 

Post-Baccalaureate Middle Childhood Education (Grade 4-9) Bachelor's Degree

What is it?
A direct route to becoming a 4th-9th grade teacher in Ohio, the Post-Baccalaureate Middle Childhood Education Licensure Program provides a bachelor's degree-holder with the coursework and assessments required to qualify for an Ohio Resident Educator License.      

What will I learn?
Course topics include lesson planning, classroom technology, classroom management and teaching strategies. In addition, the MCE program contains a specialized set of courses focused on teaching in specific content areas 鈥 language arts, mathematics, social studies or science. To meet requirements for MCE licensure, you will choose two areas of concentration from the content areas.

What can I do with a Post-Baccalaureate Middle Childhood Education (Grade 4-9)? 
With the Post-Bacc Middle Childhood Education Licensure Program, you can teach language arts, mathematics, social studies or science in Ohio's middle schools.            

Is there classroom experience or a capstone?
You'll combine online coursework with an onsite field placement during every term of your enrollment. In your final term, you'll complete a full-time student teaching experience alongside a cooperating teacher. 

How long will it take to complete?
Post-Baccalaureate Middle Childhood educator preparation programs require 108 hours of pedagogical and specialized content coursework to apply for a Ohio Resident Educator License. Franklin's transfer-friendly Post-Bacc programs enable you to make the most of your previously earned bachelor's degree credits to minimize time and cost toward teacher licensure.

Post-Baccalaureate Primary Education (PK-5) Bachelor's Degree

What is it?
A direct route to becoming a PK-5th grade teacher in Ohio, the Post-Baccalaureate Primary Education Licensure Program provides a bachelor's degree-holder with the coursework and assessments required to qualify for an Ohio Resident Educator License.    

What will I learn?
Course topics include lesson planning, classroom technology, classroom management and teaching strategies. In addition, the Primary Education program contains a specialized set of courses focused on teaching in specific content areas 鈥 language arts, mathematics, social studies or science, as well as four courses concentrated on reading instruction.

What can I do with a Post-Baccalaureate Primary Education (PK-5)?
With the Post-Bacc Primary Education Licensure Program, you can teach preschool, kindergarten or elementary school in Ohio.                  

Is there classroom experience or a capstone?
You'll combine online coursework with an onsite field placement during every term of your enrollment. In your final term, you'll complete a full-time student teaching experience alongside a cooperating teacher. 

How long will it take to complete?
Post-Baccalaurate Primary educator preparation programs require 66 hours of pedagogical and specialized content coursework to apply for a Ohio Resident Educator License. Franklin's transfer-friendly Post-Bacc programs enable you to make the most of your previously earned bachelor's degree credits to minimize time and cost toward teacher licensure.

Adolescence to Young Adult Education Employment Outlook

6%

From 2021-2031 jobs in Adolescence to Young Adult Education are expected to increase by 6%

All Occupations

2021
1,358,013 jobs
2031
1,433,808 jobs
Show Details >

Education Administrators, Kindergarten through Secondary

2021
269,588 jobs
2031
285,760 jobs

Career/Technical Education Teachers, Secondary School

2021
74,576 jobs
2031
77,588 jobs


Source information provided by Lightcast.

Get 麻豆传媒色情片Credit for What You Already Know

The certificates and training listed below are relevant to this degree program. Search our database to view pre-evaluated credentials and see how a license, certification or professional training saves you time and money toward your degree.

B.S. Adolescence to Young Adult Education Frequently Asked Questions

Back to 麻豆传媒色情片Blog

Related Programs